Theft risk - Harley Davidson Street Forum - Street 500 and 750
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post #1 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 04:36 AM Thread Starter
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Theft risk

Well I have a 2018 model that has the factory fitted alarm and immobiliser, coupled with the steering lock one would think that this would be a deterrent for the riff raff. I have however noticed a few issues with this set-up and don't believe I am alone with these thoughts.


The alarm's sensitivity cannot be adjusted. The seat can be removed from the bike without setting off the alarm, indeed the side panels can also be removed. By doing so access cab be gained to the leads from the battery - cut one of these and the alarm is disabled.

Have not had to try this on mine but I know from past experience that if you twist the steering hard / quick enough the lock will usually 'snap' and the steering can then be moved freely.


Usually someone who steals a bike like a HD has a van to transport it in so you can see that by carrying out the above then wheeling the bike to the van it could be goodbye HD!


Having had motorbikes stolen / attempted to be stolen previously I have fitted an additional motion detector alarm to mine and when at home it has a chain and anchor securing it in place. Coupled with the fact that there is a Honda Civic on the driveway making the area where the bike is stored (the back yard) inaccessable if you should want to get a bike out, I think I am as secure as I could be - but I do worry about if I am out on a ride and have to leave my bike anywhere.



I also wonder how people who go on long overnight road trips sleep at night when their bikes are simply left parked up.


Believe me, if ever I caught anyone tampering with my bike there would be a dented baseball bat disposed of somewhere and a body found lying face down in the local canal - but should that be the answer!



Society these days is ****!

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post #2 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 07:17 AM
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Get yourself insurance coverage.
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post #3 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 08:22 AM Thread Starter
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?????


Bike is insured thanks - anyone who loved their bike and had it stolen would agree it's not a good experience and the insurance is little compensation - in my opinion.

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post #4 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 08:59 AM
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The alarm does have a back up power supply, but your general thrust is right, if someone wants it bad enough, they'll get it.

I prefer to rely on my two Staffordshire Bull Terriers who are both equipped with a limited sense of humour when it comes to strangers dawdling anywhere near the house.
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post #5 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for that, I wasn't aware that the back up supply existed. Have been trying to get a manual for the newer Street models so I could see what we are up against but have had no luck so far.

I have only assumed that the alarm is at the back of the seat as that appears to be an electronic box that does not exist on the earlier models. Just seems, to me anyway, a poor design when you are able to remove the seat and get to all electrics so easily - love the bike but am not happy with this aspect of it.

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post #6 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 09:22 AM
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I'm not sure where the alarm module is on a Street, on the Street Rod it's tucked away in a pocket on the tail section and getting to it means a bit of spannering to get to it. If you unplug the module with battery leads disconnected and fob out of range the alarm will still sound. It's not a bad system all in all
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post #7 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 11:00 AM Thread Starter
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Yep, I was right then - same place on the Street. I guess it's not so bad if the alarm sounds when there is no power - I was not aware of that - Thanks for the info.

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post #8 of 17 Old 09-26-2018, 05:13 PM
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If somebody really wants to steal a motorcycle it's all but impossible to stop them. A couple of burly guys or a truck with a hoist can make off with it and the thieves can deal with locks, kill switches, and even alarms after the fact. That being said, we can do a lot to try and make our bikes less likely targets:


1) Don't let the bad guys have too much information - Get a cover, preferably one with a locking cable, so the bad guys don't really know what's underneath. Don't get one that screams Harley-Davidson, but a generic one. My initial thought was to stencil mine with "Weber Grill", but then I realized that's also a premium brand.
2) Prevent engine starts - Pulling a plug wire or installing a secondary kill switch can discourage ride off theft. Yes, anybody with mechanical skills can probably figure it out, but that takes time. These guys are most likely looking for something they can make off with quickly.
3) Immovable Object - Chain your bike to an anchor point or post set in the ground. Yes, a set of bolt cutters can make short work of the chain, but if the thief hasn't planned for that he's beat.
4) Disk Lock - If the thief breaks the fork lock, they can squeeze the clutch and wheel the bike away. A disk lock through the brake rotor will immobilize the wheel because it won't clear the brake caliper. Some of them even have their own alarms built in. Some of these can be reasonably easy to defeat with a hammer and punch, but again, that's a tool they have to bring and might not have planned on. I don't know if it's better to get a dark colored one they won't see until they are in the act of stealing the bike or a bright colored one that tells them the owner is taking some anti-theft precautions.
5) Cable lock - You might not want to drag a heavy chain everywhere, but a coiled cable is easy to stow. You can loop it through the wheels, frame and maybe a convenient immovable object. That would at least prevent them from stealing your wheels, possibly prevent roll off theft, and in the best case scenario prevent a couple of guys from carrying it off. Again, this is an easy to defeat measure, but only if they brought the right tools.
6) Go towards the light - Park under a light and not in the shadows. Thieves shy away from working in full view if at all possible.


Not being big, fancy, expensive, nor particularly fast the Street series bikes aren't coveted prizes by thieves wanting a joy ride, at least in the United States. There aren't so many of them sold that it's worth stealing one to be stripped for parts. In other words, these bikes are a pretty low value target around here. Perhaps the best thing we can do to prevent our bikes from being stolen is to park next to nicer bikes.
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post #9 of 17 Old 09-29-2018, 06:01 AM
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Target hardening is all you can do. Keep in mind that while motorcyclists fear the van style theft, that is rare. It's not practical to put a small manueverable vehicle in a large lumbering one.
Most moto thefts are simply crimes of opportunity. There is no value for 4 guys to take the risk on stealing the Street.
They do that for 30k bikes.
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post #10 of 17 Old 09-29-2018, 05:18 PM
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More to a safe place . really I don't know about the UK but for the most part it is not a big issue in US. Many bike thief's are planned owner want to collect on it. professional bike thiefs don't want these type bikes here.
They want crotch rockets with lots of plastic on them . Easy money on the used market. Insure it and sleep well.
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