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Discussion Starter #1
I'm seeing a lot of good deals on bikes that basically sat for five years. How do the fuel injection components hold up with old gas sitting in the system for 3-5 years?
 

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I would Drain the tank and refill with fresh. Adding Seafoam will help. Don't forget the Brake Fluid, Coolant, Hoses and other things that could deteriorate over time.
Bingo, we have a winner. I would always first ask when was the last time the motorcycle was fired up or taken for a ride of course. Low mileage doesn't mean engine wasn't periodically fired up to ensure that everything remained in good working order.


The problem isn't really with "old" liqiuds like fuel, oil, etc. but instead if the motorcycle sits dry for an extended period of time. Just drain the old, add the new, and everything is generally good to go. If it's sat for a long period of time it's probably good to shoot a little oil into the cylinders (by removing the plug) and hand turn over the engine to ensure the rings haven't seized but that's for engines that have sat for a very long period of time without being turned over.
 

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It's from a HD dealer. 10k for a 09 V-rod. 1500 miles. I've heard the fuel can get old and mess things up. But in a modem fuel injected system only the injectors and fuel pump touch the fuel? No fuel distributor...
 

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I know what you mean about a dry start though. Definitely will be listening for any ominous engine noises.
 

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If its from the Lord (HD dealer) then it was probably checked over. I know my Chapel (Brians HD) replaces brake pads if they are at 50% or less.
 

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my 08 V-Rod has sat most of it 8 years of ownership in storage. i've simply mixed in 3/4 of a small bottle of Stabil, filled the tank, and pulled the maxi fuse when leaving it alone for extended time. so long as the battery has juice, it has always started easily when coming back. longest time it sat still was from 2010-2011 when i was deployed to Afghanistan; tires got soft so it was sketchy loading it onto the trailer.

it currently sits in storage, and the soonest i plan to check it again is maybe in 2017. as this is likely the longest it will be in storage, i made sure to have new oil put in before parking it in storage, as well as using the whole bottle of stabil prior to filling the tank.

edit, it has 12017 miles when parked last
 

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Let me get this straight, you are talking about storing high mileage motorcycles for a few years right?

If your old bike has say, 7000 miles and it was stored for at least a year, why wouldn't you rebuild the motor first?

With 7K or more miles, you must know that there is a lot of wear on the motor and drive train, and storage only accelerates the deterioration.

Wouldn't it be better to recycle your old bike and purchase a new reliable Harley?













k
 

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Bingo, we have a winner. I would always first ask when was the last time the motorcycle was fired up or taken for a ride of course. Low mileage doesn't mean engine wasn't periodically fired up to ensure that everything remained in good working order.


The problem isn't really with "old" liqiuds like fuel, oil, etc. but instead if the motorcycle sits dry for an extended period of time. Just drain the old, add the new, and everything is generally good to go. If it's sat for a long period of time it's probably good to shoot a little oil into the cylinders (by removing the plug) and hand turn over the engine to ensure the rings haven't seized but that's for engines that have sat for a very long period of time without being turned over.
If a bike is going to sit the worst thing you can do is start and let it run a bit and shut it down. Ride it or don't. Starting it does not help it.
If it is going to sit a long time fog cylinders .
 

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This is the quintessential "it depends". If the motorcycle was lightly used over a number of years and properly maintained and winterized, itshouldn't be a problem. If it was used quite a bit at first and then stuck in the back of a shed for the rest of that time without being properly moth balled, it could be quite the project.


Growing up my neighbor had a UJM garage queen. It got a thorough maintenance every spring and full winterization in the fall. The guy was kind of a Goldilocks rider, though, and only ventured out on it when conditions were just right. He probably rode it just enough to burn off the fuel that had the stabilizer in it from the previous fall and maybe a second tank of gas each summer before winterizing it again. I wouldn't have too many qualms about buying that bike.


On the other hand I've known people to buy just about anything with a motor and then stuff it in a shed or leave it in the bushes as soon as new wears off or the need that caused them to purchase whatever gets satisfied. After a few years they realize it's taking up space and is a fungible asset. Then they sell it as "barely used". Those types of cars, trucks, tractors, lawn mowers, boat motors and motorcycles are likely to turn into projects.
 
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