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Hey Guys,

I'm looking to upgrade my bike, I'm fairly new on it and I find the handlebars a little too low. Can anyone share their experience with doing this, I was looking at a drag/T bar and risers but really can't find much info on how to do it, or which is easier/quicker. Just need it a little higher so it's more comfortable.

Also accessories wise, which is the best tail bag to fit the stock rack? Best lockable panniers? Tankbag?

I'm looking to go on a road trip soon and don't want to be lugging a big heavy bag on my back.

I'm in Dublin, Ireland so there is that apprehension where I'd have to buy everything online.

All answers welcome, Really appreciate it.

Thanks.
 

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Welcome
Welcome to the forum! I'm sure a lot of folks around here will be chiming in pretty soon. Unfortunately most of what I can offer is what I find in the United States and importing my choices could be a hassle. We've got a number of members from the EU and UK who can probably provide some insight into what can be sourced within the Eurozone.

Which bike do you have? I'm not sure it makes a difference, but it never hurts to know. I don't think the Street Rod has a luggage rack available, so since you ask about it I'm assuming you have a Street 750.

General Wrenching Advice

Much of the time when I am mounting parts I go to the H-D website and go to the parts pages. If you dig deep enough you will often find installation instructions with important things like torque specs that come in handy even if you are mounting somebody else's similar product. Sometimes, like when I looked up the instructions for the H-D drag bar, they just refer you back to the service manual.

If you are going to do much of your own wrenching you really should get the service manual. It's got a lot of good stuff in it that you might not think about, like torque specs, which thread locker to use where, and which parts not to reuse. I never would have thought to replace the O-ring on the drain plug with every oil change but it's in the manual.

Handlebars

How much higher do you want the bars? Somewhere beyond the 6"-8" range you will need to replace control cables with longer ones.

A single T-bar might be slightly quicker than installing risers and then the bar into the riser, but not by much. Some risers allow you more adjustments than the bar alone, but that's also more expensive and more bolts to work loose down the road.

Luggage

I don't tour, so my luggage needs have been minimal. Mostly it consists of picking up shopping on my way home from work or dropping off a laptop at FedEx. I tend to get cheap, generic, cordura nylon bags for now. I'd like to update to lockable hard bags from Viking next year. Those would be lockable.

CycleGear.com had some generic, nylon, throw over saddlebags in their add on a closeout sale, so no current link for those. They hold clothing and a CPAP machine for a weekend out at the farm. I purchased the saree guards (H-D PN 60300091A/60300092A for right and left) from Surdyke.com to prevent the soft saddlebags (or paniers) from getting into the rear wheel. You can order them from your local dealer or an online discounter. They are also good attachment points for straps and bungee nets.

Adding an Iron Rider Overnight bag from J&P Cycles is enough extra carrying capacity for clothing to last the week. Again, it was a cheap closeout deal so no link provided. It's a good sized square nylon case with stiffeners to hold its shape. Think of it as a poor man's tour pack or a semi-soft topcase. It has cinch straps to hold it to the package rack and sissy bar. D-rings permit strapping something else on top of it. It's the perfect place for my CPAP machine, freeing space in the saddlebags.

I also have an Oxford Topcase that I may install some day. It's lockable, but I don't know that it is durable enough that a thief couldn't just bust into it. I actually bought a spare package rack to mount this to so that I could take it off quite easily.

Bungee nets are your friend. I sometimes carry laptops that stick out of the saddlebags, but a bungee net over the top keeps everything in place. They can also be used to secure items to the package rack, sissy bar, or back seat. Obviously these aren't secure storage if you are leaving the bike somewhere.

My luggage is only lockable in that the zippers have loops accommodating toy like luggage padlocks. The reasons I haven't worried about locks are:
  1. A thief with a knife could slice through the cordura nylon easily enough that a locked zipper won't deter them.
  2. A thief with a brain would unbuckle or cut the straps and take the bags as a unit.
  3. I normally don't carry anything worth stealing.
Revzilla
Revzilla has a couple of resources you may want to look into. They have a Common Tread blog post Motorcycle camping: The basics you need to get out there as well as a companion YouTube video How to Go Motorcycle Camping.How to Go Motorcycle Camping. Both of these go quite in depth on luggage and stowing gear on the bike and kind of shallow on the actual camping.
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut"
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@PugslyCat gave you some very good suggestions. I will second the recommendation to secure any luggage so it doesn't get into the wheels. Another suggestion that's worked for me a few times. Pack super light, when you get to destination go buy a few jeans and shirts to use when you are there. You can either mail the clothes back home or give them to a charity. Sounds a little str, but works real well. Just budget a hundred dollars or so to do this. Since you aren't having to spend a lot of money on luggage, you are actually not out that much. Plus the extra weight, depends on how loaded, can effect the way the bike handles.
 

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My "road trips" requiring luggage have mostly been weekend trips from an apartment I keep near the job site in central Iowa back to my home in the southwest corner of the state. That's a ride of 200 miles. The obvious solution for me was to just keep clothing at both ends of the journey and carry as little as possible in between.

Sometimes you can ship luggage ahead of time and pick it up. I've done this when visiting friends and relatives.

Along those lines, you may want to check out US Post office general delivery service. This is basically mailing parcels to points along your route and picking them up at the post office as you arrive. Talk to your local post office for details. There are some time limits involved.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjci_-I953sAhXIG80KHTvXAJUQFjAAegQIAxAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Ffaq.usps.com%2Fs%2Farticle%2FWhat-is-General-Delivery&usg=AOvVaw2CvQv-64D4a2MdISFR6AqZ
 
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