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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It looks like the stock belts on these bikes are difficult to find. I measured the pitch on mine today and it's 11 mm from center to center of any two teeth. The number of teeth on the stock belt is 166. The closest belt that I could find is one for a BMW 650 CS Scaver, which uses 172 teeth, and has the same pitch of 11mm. The BMW belts are also difficult to find and very expensive, around 400 dollars or more, which leaves them as a last option for more than one reason because fabricating and mounting a belt tensioner to the swingarm would also be necessary to use one.

Does anyone know where to purchase new unused rear drive belts to fit these bikes other than from salvage yards or ebay? I would think anything from 165 to 166 teeth would fit if it were 11mm pitch. If so I would probably buy 3 or 4 of them at a time or try to find a sportster to trade it for before the final drive belt goes out. This was a very sneaky tactic, HD used to be valued for interchangeability. Almost no one makes an affordable belt over 140 teeth, especially in 11mm. I haven't asked at the dealer yet but recently I went to search for parts there, and the parts they still had listed seemed to be discontinued on just about everything on this bike. Has anyone tried to purchase a replacement drive belt from a dealer? If so which one, cause I would like to knock their door down and buy a few belts from them.
 

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"Loose Nut" from Houston, Texas
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True that belts can get expensive. From experience, when taken care of, belts last 100k miles plus. Keep tension set correctly and don't use any dressing on it. Other than a rock getting stuck between the belt and pulley, I've never had an issue.
 

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The part number Sarge2481 gave you is correct for the Street 500 and 750. Don't panic, it should be available from any Harley Davidson dealer parts dept.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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Third party support of these bikes has never been good, so you still need to plan on going to the dealership for pretty much any power train parts.

Harley-Davidson is still manufacturing the Street 500 in small numbers exclusively for their dealers to use as Rider Academy bikes. My guess is that they will batch these out once or twice a year and satisfy any back ordered spare parts for customers at the same time. Don't expect any accessories beyond what is currently on dealers' shelves, unless it's something that also fits other bikes like the Sportster.

With automobile manufacturers there are laws in the United States requiring manufacturers to continue supplying repair parts for a number of years following the discontinuance of a model. I don't know whether that applies to motorcycles or not.

Harley-Davidson is pretty good at providing parts for older, discontinued models. I saw a video a while ago, I believe by John Maxwell, that you can still get some parts for pretty much any post-war Harley. Of course most of those sold more units than the Streets did.

H-D does have a reputation for parts interchangeability between many models. That's because in the past they have made a handful of engine and frame combinations and hung different accessories on them to call the different models. Right now they mostly manufacture six bikes, those being Sportsters (in North America), Softails, and touring frame bikes each with two engine sizes in each. Add different accessories and you get to something like 40 different models. Unfortunately Street parts only interchange with other Streets.

Lastly, if you are worried about finding drive belts you can find a thread around here somewhere about buying a Ducati front sprocket and converting to chain drive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like the Ducati idea. If it's the same size transmission shaft I'll probably look into that. I searched a 1099 streetfighter and the splines are the same number; 14. Never liked the idea of running a rear wheel drive belt, they're prone to failure without notice, difficult to change outside of a shop, and impossible to repair. A 530 O ring chain works just as well, doesn't throw oil either, and is very durable compared to a rubber belt. The only advantage to a rear belt is that it lets you know exactly when you need bearings. Other than that it's a good way to leave yourself stranded, and the simplicity of running one is irrelevant because you have to carry a spare with you anyway.
 

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Except these belts I believe are Kevlar lined and the street series of bikes don't make the power to snap one. Unless its a very old belt or the rear wheel is misaligned they don't generally go bad. If I had to put a new belt on every 5 to 10 years as like a preventative maintenance, that's not really all that bad. A chain will make you feel everything.

IMO the belt is just as reliable as a chain, but you lose a bit of power due to its flexibility. On the other hand riding and shifting is much smoother and comfortable. Even o-ring chains will sling oil, just not as much as standard chains. Chain needs to be oiled every 300-500 miles, belt you leave alone. Each has their tradeoffs but I think belts suit these bikes well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess the thing about belts is, it just looks like something that if you ran without the cover on it you could easily have a chunk of asphalt or a rock jump up in there with it running that close to the ground, unlike a primary belt, which sits higher up and not right off of the roadway. Running a primary belt on a Big Twin is worth the risk of snapping one every once in a while because of the convenience factor of having your clutch right out in the open, and also because you can eliminate primary oil from leaking on the ground. Also they look very cool. Unlike a rear wheel belt which looks dumb. Nevermind the fact that all someone would have to do is take something sharp to it and you could be stuck walking somewhere and donating lots of free parts to ebay.
 

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I guess the thing about belts is, it just looks like something that if you ran without the cover on it you could easily have a chunk of asphalt or a rock jump up in there with it running that close to the ground, unlike a primary belt, which sits higher up and not right off of the roadway. Running a primary belt on a Big Twin is worth the risk of snapping one every once in a while because of the convenience factor of having your clutch right out in the open, and also because you can eliminate primary oil from leaking on the ground. Also they look very cool. Unlike a rear wheel belt which looks dumb. Nevermind the fact that all someone would have to do is take something sharp to it and you could be stuck walking somewhere and donating lots of free parts to ebay.
I mean if someone walks up to your bike with a knife wanting to cut something, sure they wont cut a chain, but you still have brake lines, tires, wires, etc. If they wanted to, they could just pop the right side cover off and steal fuses so you still would be stranded. Also chains aren't exactly impervious to coming apart either, I've been on a couple rides where someones chain flew off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Some risks are worth the trouble and others aren't. It's an unnecessary risk, something like wearing flip flops on the highway, or riding a long way without a helmet.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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I sure wish that H-D had checked with somebody who had real world motorcycling experience before putting riders at risk for the last 40 years and some billions of miles ridden.

We've had a lot of people asking about chain conversions, but I don't recall anybody that has come back and said they accomplished it and were glad that they went through the trouble of doing so.

As they say at Pack Up & Ride:
In general, a properly maintained motorcycle can will last 20,000 to 30,000 miles, sometimes more. But, some last as little as 5,000 to 10,000 miles. This difference is due to the type of chain, how and where you ride, and how well you maintain it.
By properly maintained they mean constant cleaning, lubricating and tensioning every cumulative 500-600 miles or 100+ miles in a single day.

Compare that to what Motorcyclist Magazine has to say about belt drives:
A properly cared for drive belt can last a hundred thousand miles, and maintaining it just means checking its condition and tension about as often as you change the oil and filter.
Yes, if you ran without the cover on it you could easily have something get between the belt and pulley like a rock or your pant leg. The solution is to leave the cover on. The same thing can happen with a chain. Yes, a broken chain can usually be fixed in situ whereas the belt would need to be replaced, probably not on site.

If someone would take something sharp to your Kevlar reinforced belt they could also cut your seat, tires, any number of wires, water hoses and brake lines and it would be a lot easier on the culprit. If somebody is that vindictive they could also sabotage your chain. I don't see how either situation would leave you "donating lots of free parts to ebay[sic]." You just repair or replace the belt or chain and move on. Maybe you make a point of parking your bike in better neighborhoods or not pissing people off so much.

Now there are some good reasons that some people prefer chain drives in some situations. One member wanted to experiment with the gearing by switching to different sprockets. Another member was doing a scrambler build, and when you are going off road you know you will be breaking chains and needing to fix them trailside. If you have a high powered bike, especially one with instant power delivery, a chain will stand up better to the forces involved.

You haven't voiced any of those concerns, just that you are worried you won't be able to get a replacement or that somebody might vandalize your bike.
 

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When I bought my bike in 2016 the sales man told me that the belt would last life time. I used to ride Yamahas previously with diamond brand chains. How long is a belt supposed to last under normal riding conditions?
 

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"Loose Nut" from Houston, Texas
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Can easily see 100k miles plus on a belt if properly maintained.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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I don't recall anybody around here ever saying much about replacing a worn out belt unless there was misalignment. There have been some damaged when the front pulley bolt breaks and the pulley whizzes into various other parts doing damage.
 
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I have a 2015 street xg 750 with V.H competition exhaust the Rapter Charger intake and Vance Hines fuel pack and run my on custom Map I have been looking into the chain idea. I'm more interested in the ability to change ratio of the output shaft to the rear wheel. I do believe we can get a lot higher top end out of our bikes in less than 100 feet the bike is going into 3d. I can run 50mph in 6th gear without a problem then take off like a rocket. There is so much low end tourq in the 750. Platform I feel it has some to give for more top end speed at lower rpm
 
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