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I bought my Street 750 the end of May and have been caught in the rain several times. Everything from a light shower to a pretty decent downpour. The bike handles very well in the rain. I have got 500 miles on the bike and close to 200 have been in the rain. I have learned that when the weather report state 30% chance of afternoon/ evening showers it means I have a 100% chance if getting rained on. Over all I have been pleasantly surprised with the handling and the performance of the bike. Just wish the weather would be more cooperative.
 

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A little off topic but I tried mine on some roto-mill yesterday, on purpose; something I dread wet or dry. Although this strip was dry that stuff can still be bad. I must say the bike performed surprisingly well; a lot better than the SOFTAIL that I used to have. I was concerned about the relative small front wheel/tire configuration but I'm happy to report-not too bad. However, I still hate roto-mill and 'grated' bridge riding!
 

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We had a week straight of heavy showers the second week I had my bike. The only time I ever had any problem is when i had the lag and leap problem happen in slight rain while turning and it lost traction and went down because I didn't catch it in time. Otherwise, it's had no problem.
 

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I've just hit 6,000 miles since I got the bike in October. A good amount of that was in NYC over the Fall and Winter, which are pretty wet, as well as the Spring in Colorado, which is also not exactly dry. I've had the bike in some tight canyons during pretty solid rains. The bike handles just fine. But do yourself a favor and watch Twist of the Wrist II on Youtube. You'll learn so much about proper technique, and if you're smooth and deliberate with your rolling on and off of the throttle, you would be surprised how well any bike handles in less than ideal conditions. Just don't snap the throttle or upset the suspension and rain won't be much of an issue.
 

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Well I got my first dose of a nice little thunderstorm. Was a learning curve for sure. Out on a semi-country busy road, speed limit 55. Looked to my right and could see it heading across my path. It was moving right to left across the road. I tried to out run it hoping to get on the other side of it. I could see the storm and the wall of rain across the fields.

First lesson was the high wind prelude at 55. Crap I thought I was gonna be blown right into opposite traffic. Slowed down to 40 just to maintain my lane. Then the down pour hit and the rain was blowing. I went as far as about a mile. I had to stop the rain hurts and couldn't see well.
After I pulled off I noticed even cars where pulling over. I watched the rain blow across like curtains in a breeze. Didnt last long, and I pack extra cloths.
The bike impressed me, handled really well during the down pour never felt it slip. After on the wet pavement, I remembered someone mentioned here to be careful of the road paint. So that helped, and using calm and steady, riding on the wet pavement wasn't a issue even at posted speed limit.
The worst part for me was cleaning the dang bike. But I'm glad I got the experience.
 
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a good rain suit is a terrible thing to leave at home...lol

I have a few different ones.

my sport touring rain suit is made by tour master and cost around $100 if I remember right. my 2nd one is the frogg toggs, cost about $40 and can be had at some sporting good stores, a lot of (duck) hunters buy them.

I also have a few sport touring jackets that are water proof.
on my other bike only the tips of my boots get wet as long as I am moving due to all the body fairing, electric windshield, etc.

AND...last....what ever I am wearing at the time is my rain suit.

BUT, be careful of the hot muffler melting your rain pants all over it....and yes rain hurts at high speeds. as a kid I rode a lot with out a shirt, and have even ridden over 100 mph in the rain years ago.

as far as handling, pay attention to hazards, such as ponding water, ruts, unknown depth of pot holes, leaves and debris, leave more of a following distance, don't brake or turn too hard or fast, just hazard awareness and common sense can go along ways...always pay attention.

now...go out there and get wet and have some fun...lol !
 

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Well I got my first dose of a nice little thunderstorm. Was a learning curve for sure. Out on a semi-country busy road, speed limit 55. Looked to my right and could see it heading across my path. It was moving right to left across the road. I tried to out run it hoping to get on the other side of it. I could see the storm and the wall of rain across the fields.

First lesson was the high wind prelude at 55. Crap I thought I was gonna be blown right into opposite traffic. Slowed down to 40 just to maintain my lane. Then the down pour hit and the rain was blowing. I went as far as about a mile. I had to stop the rain hurts and couldn't see well.
After I pulled off I noticed even cars where pulling over. I watched the rain blow across like curtains in a breeze. Didnt last long, and I pack extra cloths.
The bike impressed me, handled really well during the down pour never felt it slip. After on the wet pavement, I remembered someone mentioned here to be careful of the road paint. So that helped, and using calm and steady, riding on the wet pavement wasn't a issue even at posted speed limit.
The worst part for me was cleaning the dang bike. But I'm glad I got the experience.
when the rain gets too intense, I pull my arse off the road somewhere :)
 

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lol thanks Rock. Some good advice there and its much appreciated. Especially about the exhaust melting the rain suit. I would have smelled it burning and thought, great another HD defect issue lol
 
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