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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled the fuel tank a few weeks ago to replace the throttle cables, add a tachometer and a 12v charging socket. Let's just call it a learning experience. I became motivated to make it easier to get the crossover tube around the frame. Otherwise, tank removal can't happen.

Use a siphon to remove as much gas as possible. The next thing to do is remove the stock hose. I recommend clamping the crossover hose on both sides of the center that is in front of the frame. Put a catch pan underneath. Cut it! Drain the fuel if there's any left. Get the fuel tank on the work bench. Now, using diagonal cutters or whatever you like, break the stock (single use) hose clamp. Remove the two halves of the hose.

For replacement, I used Gates 5/16" fuel line. It doesn't have to be fuel injection (45 psi) hose. Make two hoses, a little shorter than the stock single hose. Hose clamp the two hoses to the fuel tank. Attach one side of the 90 degree union to one hose with a clamp. Set up the tank on the frame. Attach the other side of the union with a hose clamp. Shorten the hose lines if you feel like it, as not to hit the radiator fan. Finish the setup with the ground wire, the electric connector, and the actual fuel line.

Next time when you need to remove the fuel tank, clamp the two hoses with two hose clamp pliers from the auto parts store. This just might reduce the gas spill potential.

I'll look up the brand of my hose clamps and make it a comment. Light Automotive tire Organism Font Space
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That's a great tip! removing the tank is a common chore if you are doing much with the wiring of these bikes. It cost a fortune for the Harley dealership to install the bar mounted power port on my bike mostly due to the time required to remove the tank. Similarly the Memphis Shade headlight relocation kit will require the tank to be removed to run wires, although some people manage without doing that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a great tip! removing the tank is a common chore if you are doing much with the wiring of these bikes. It cost a fortune for the Harley dealership to install the bar mounted power port on my bike mostly due to the time required to remove the tank. Similarly the Memphis Shade headlight relocation kit will require the tank to be removed to run wires, although some people manage without doing that.
Thanks for the reply, PugslyCat.
It may be the kind of trick that a shop tech knows how to do and makes extra money by charging the hourly by the 'book'.
The Norma clamps are better than the usual stuff. I don't want to fool around with fuel lines.
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I pulled the fuel tank a few weeks ago to replace the throttle cables, add a tachometer and a 12v charging socket. Let's just call it a learning experience. I became motivated to make it easier to get the crossover tube around the frame. Otherwise, tank removal can't happen.

Use a siphon to remove as much gas as possible. The next thing to do is remove the stock hose. I recommend clamping the crossover hose on both sides of the center that is in front of the frame. Put a catch pan underneath. Cut it! Drain the fuel if there's any left. Get the fuel tank on the work bench. Now, using diagonal cutters or whatever you like, break the stock (single use) hose clamp. Remove the two halves of the hose.

For replacement, I used Gates 5/16" fuel line. It doesn't have to be fuel injection (45 psi) hose. Make two hoses, a little shorter than the stock single hose. Hose clamp the two hoses to the fuel tank. Attach one side of the 90 degree union to one hose with a clamp. Set up the tank on the frame. Attach the other side of the union with a hose clamp. Shorten the hose lines if you feel like it, as not to hit the radiator fan. Finish the setup with the ground wire, the electric connector, and the actual fuel line.

Next time when you need to remove the fuel tank, clamp the two hoses with two hose clamp pliers from the auto parts store. This just might reduce the gas spill potential.

I'll look up the brand of my hose clamps and make it a comment. View attachment 28053 View attachment 28054 View attachment 28055
ONCE THE LINE IS CUT,,,IS THERE SOME KIND OF A TAP, THAT CAN BE PUT IN. INLINE,,, TURN TAP AND IT DRAINS,,???
 

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I’m also thinking if an no float LSK Fuel Gauge Pro can be installed. The fuel gauge control unit in the diagram below get info from the line connecting both sides. Also do we need the tank removed for working on cables or is it possible just to tilt ( without fuel in it) the tank straight up towards the front( triple tree). Looks like enough of space there..

Line Font Parallel Slope Diagram
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’m also thinking if an no float LSK Fuel Gauge Pro can be installed. The fuel gauge control unit in the diagram below get info from the line connecting both sides. Also do we need the tank removed for working on cables or is it possible just to tilt ( without fuel in it) the tank straight up towards the front( triple tree). Looks like enough of space there..

View attachment 28119
My Street already has a fuel warning alert. Plus, the trip meter is a handy reminder of when to gas up. 100 miles and re-fill.
 

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I pulled the fuel tank a few weeks ago to replace the throttle cables, add a tachometer and a 12v charging socket. Let's just call it a learning experience. I became motivated to make it easier to get the crossover tube around the frame. Otherwise, tank removal can't happen.

Use a siphon to remove as much gas as possible. The next thing to do is remove the stock hose. I recommend clamping the crossover hose on both sides of the center that is in front of the frame. Put a catch pan underneath. Cut it! Drain the fuel if there's any left. Get the fuel tank on the work bench. Now, using diagonal cutters or whatever you like, break the stock (single use) hose clamp. Remove the two halves of the hose.

For replacement, I used Gates 5/16" fuel line. It doesn't have to be fuel injection (45 psi) hose. Make two hoses, a little shorter than the stock single hose. Hose clamp the two hoses to the fuel tank. Attach one side of the 90 degree union to one hose with a clamp. Set up the tank on the frame. Attach the other side of the union with a hose clamp. Shorten the hose lines if you feel like it, as not to hit the radiator fan. Finish the setup with the ground wire, the electric connector, and the actual fuel line.

Next time when you need to remove the fuel tank, clamp the two hoses with two hose clamp pliers from the auto parts store. This just might reduce the gas spill potential.

I'll look up the brand of my hose clamps and make it a comment. View attachment 28053 View attachment 28054 View attachment 28055
Is using the metal connectors safe. There is a lot of heat and fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No link.
It costs $40 + shipping. My fuel line clamps are dirt cheap. They were already in my tool bag. I already have a solution that was free to me. Maybe someone else will want to use them.
 

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No link.
It costs $40 + shipping. My fuel line clamps are dirt cheap. They were already in my tool bag. I already have a solution that was free to me. Maybe someone else will want to use them.
The link”Motorcycle Dual Shutoff Quick Disconnect”… | MotoSport all good… I had tried to manufacture and sell good quality bags( using good material for skin and dusty resistant/ approved by government standards, safety standards ) and it costs .…so even though the price is not cheap but is certainly affordable… probably as you said somebody else can use the link…cheers…
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The link”Motorcycle Dual Shutoff Quick Disconnect”… | MotoSport all good… I had tried to manufacture and sell good quality bags( using good material for skin and dusty resistant/ approved by government standards, safety standards ) and it costs .…so even though the price is not cheap but is certainly affordable… probably as you said somebody else can use the link…cheers…
I got the Motion Pro shut offs from Amazon, $27.99 total. When I get some time, I'll do a re-design of the cross over fuel lines with the shut offs. We'll see if the work. It will be a real time and aggravation saver if they're good!
I looked at the fuel gauge. 118 Euros + shipping from the UK. Ouch. Good to know this thing is out there. The design is good, no floating arm!
 

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I got the Motion Pro shut offs from Amazon, $27.99 total. When I get some time, I'll do a re-design of the cross over fuel lines with the shut offs. We'll see if the work. It will be a real time and aggravation saver if they're good!
I looked at the fuel gauge. 118 Euros + shipping from the UK. Ouch. Good to know this thing is out there. The design is good, no floating arm!
The fuel gauge- it is an interesting one- please check if it will work with pressure from this cross over pipe if you thought about the purchase. I did a trip about 230kms( 148 miles) and used the trip B as fuel gauge. The bike will ride about 240-250 kms( 155miles) ( 110 kmph speed-68MPH )in highways before the low fuel light lit up . The tank capacity is 13.1 gallon and reserve is .8 gallon( this should give you at least 32 miles or more) . So we can get up to 187 miles range in a single tank fill up.

The motion pro crossover adapter should work good. Thanks for letting know.

cheers,
 
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