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Nothing new or substantial in the review . BTW anyone else concerned by the size of the bike ? Dude is 5'11 and looks big .
 

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Worst review ever !!
Guy dosent know what hes talking about.
Got his 0-100 figures messed up. !! Does a wheelie on a Harley n thinks thats the sell point !!
Making comparisons to Bajaj Avenger !!! Seriously !!! Grhhh
Who the f**k gave him the keys to a Harley. !!!
Im sure this douchebag rides a CBZ back home. !! Poser !!
 

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Nothing new or substantial in the review . BTW anyone else concerned by the size of the bike ? Dude is 5'11 and looks big .
It is substantially larger and heavier than my R80G/S and those are routinely loaded up and ridden great distances. The wheelbase is greater than that of my K100RS. I don't consider it to be a small bike. Changes to the seat height, handlebar and foot peg position can easily fit the bike to any rider.
 

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totally agree.. lets say for tall riders move the foot pegs further forward and it should give more comfortable fitting

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It is substantially larger and heavier than my R80G/S and those are routinely loaded up and ridden great distances. The wheelbase is greater than that of my K100RS. I don't consider it to be a small bike. Changes to the seat height, handlebar and foot peg position can easily fit the bike to any rider.
I think I failed to convey what I intended to say so let me try again - by size I don't mean to say it is practically inadequate since I felt comfortable on the saddle even with the mid set controls. Length and weight are certainly on the higher side so not an issue either , seat height is comfortable as well.

It is the relative height of the fuel tank as compared to the seat(I guess an outcome of 60deg v-twin hence lower engine height) and hence the rider than gives an appearance of the rider sitting on top of the motorcycle rather than behind the tank ( for example an iron 883 ). This is a visual micropsia but something that might appear to be odd when a 6'2 90kg person is astride the bike. Also the pillion seat in its current form offers very little bum real-estate , either I will have to find a size zero girlfriend or make the current one run 10kms every day :D
 

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That's very interesting review indeed ,"they also mentioned MRF have tailor manufactured 170 size tyres for rear wheel ,any comments on that ???
How much do u people think the performance would come down going for wider tyres ???
And the reviewer mentions rear tyre size as 150 ,so much confusion on specs ,65nm torque keep doing rounds in Internet ,but HD site in india mention 60nm...
 

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I think I failed to convey what I intended to say so let me try again - by size I don't mean to say it is practically inadequate since I felt comfortable on the saddle even with the mid set controls. Length and weight are certainly on the higher side so not an issue either , seat height is comfortable as well.

It is the relative height of the fuel tank as compared to the seat(I guess an outcome of 60deg v-twin hence lower engine height) and hence the rider than gives an appearance of the rider sitting on top of the motorcycle rather than behind the tank ( for example an iron 883 ). This is a visual micropsia but something that might appear to be odd when a 6'2 90kg person is astride the bike. Also the pillion seat in its current form offers very little bum real-estate , either I will have to find a size zero girlfriend or make the current one run 10kms every day :D
The seat on my R80GS is only a couple of cm lower than the top of the fuel tank. Sitting above the bike is normal to me. I have never seen the appeal of low deeply cupped seats. Give me a long, wide flat seat I can move around on and be comfortable on. On my Street Rod I had a local upholsterer basically fill in the seat pocket and move what little was left of the step back so the seat is essentially flat now. He widened it a bit as well. Now it is comfortable for me, and this has the side benefit of giving me additional leg room, since the Street Rod has a normal mid-set foot peg placement. The riding position matches my BMWs now. The riding position of something like a Night Rod Special or even worse a Road Glide is very awkward, and uncomfortable as all heck.

This feet out in front thing is all wrong for rider control. You can't weight the inside peg for a turn nor can you stand up on the pegs to clear an obstacle in the road, or a really bad bump as you can with normally placed mid-set foot controls. I have noticed that in the thirty something years since I first took an MSF riding course they have deleted the exercise of riding your bike over a length of 4 X 4 lumber to test your ability to ride over an unexpected piece of something on the road that you can't otherwise avoid (hey, stuff falls off trucks even in the US). The cruisers can't do it. Sacrifice capability and safety for looks? No thank you.
 

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It is substantially larger and heavier than my R80G/S and those are routinely loaded up and ridden great distances. The wheelbase is greater than that of my K100RS. I don't consider it to be a small bike. Changes to the seat height, handlebar and foot peg position can easily fit the bike to any rider.

It's funny to me because in the 1960's, when I first learned to ride motorcycles, the 500/750 would have been considered large motorcycles. Since then we've had "inflation" and they would be considered medium size motorcycles today.


Yes, even a small motorcycle, such as my very early Yamaha 70, can accomodate a large person. It's all about adjusting the motorcycle to you and adjusting you to the motorcycle.
 

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This feet out in front thing is all wrong for rider control. You can't weight the inside peg for a turn nor can you stand up on the pegs to clear an obstacle in the road, or a really bad bump as you can with normally placed mid-set foot controls.
Riding a "chopper" that has the low seat, forward foot controls and often ape-hanger handle bars requires a different riding style when compared to the typical center foot controls and upright riding position of the standard motorcycle. It's not better or worse from a riding standpoint, it's just different like riding a road-racing motorcycle or drag bike with rear foot controls and a laid forward body position.


Once the different styles of riding are mastered there's no difference as far as the capability of the motorcycle to handle different situations such as being able to go over a 4x4 representing an unexpected road condition or handling in a turn which has to do with suspension and configuration of the motorcycle. The motorcycle really doesn't care about how the rider is positioned on the motorcycle.


One's not better or worse than another for street riding, it's just different, that's all.
 

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It's funny to me because in the 1960's, when I first learned to ride motorcycles, the 500/750 would have been considered large motorcycles. Since then we've had "inflation" and they would be considered medium size motorcycles today.


Yes, even a small motorcycle, such as my very early Yamaha 70, can accomodate a large person. It's all about adjusting the motorcycle to you and adjusting you to the motorcycle.
I'm with you on that. When I was a saucepan in the 70's a mate and I went two-up all over France and Spain one summer on my Honda CB350. The guys with us rode a 250 Yahaha 2 stroke. We had luggage racks and rucksacks and that was about it.

I reckon the 750 will do anything you want and you just have to get used to a few imperfections - like anything else. ��
 

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I'm with you on that. When I was a saucepan in the 70's a mate and I went two-up all over France and Spain one summer on my Honda CB350. The guys with us rode a 250 Yahaha 2 stroke. We had luggage racks and rucksacks and that was about it.

I reckon the 750 will do anything you want and you just have to get used to a few imperfections - like anything else. ��


You'll love this then. My partner has an 1968 90cc Harley-Davidson engine sitting on a shelf that'd I want to use for a mini-chopper project. I would use that little choppoer for long distant road trips (because I can - LOL). I'm inspired by a Canadian rider that rode a 50cc Motobecane for a 15,000 mile road trip back in the 1960's as I recall. Of interest I also own a 1964 50cc Mobylette Motobecane.


There's no reason that "small" limits how much fun you can have on a motorcycle. Small motorcycles can often be more fun than large ones because you ride slower in most cases and that makes the joy of ride last much longer.
 
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