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hello everyone, sorry for the stupid question but by chance if you leave the handlebars for a few seconds your bike tends to the right or left? Mine on the right, it seems to have the forks slightly out of line ..
Thank you
 

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"Loose Nut" from Houston, Texas
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Could be a simple wheel alignment issue. This video is for a chain bike, but process is the same for all.

 

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hello everyone, sorry for the stupid question but by chance if you leave the handlebars for a few seconds your bike tends to the right or left? Mine on the right, it seems to have the forks slightly out of line ..
Thank you
Front forks out of line? I would look at Les' post on wheel alignment. I've never heard of such a thing as out of line forks. The forks are locked between a pair of triple tree mounts. So, unless you have a fractured triple tree or two, your forks are in line. After a heavy collision fork tubes can get bent. But, that doesn't seem to have happened.
 

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1. Run one fork up the triple and top crown. Only lock the fork at the one pinch. Why? You are going to float the other fork and spin the axle till you find the sweet spot. Lock only one pinch of the other side, meaning top is pinched on one fork, bottom pinched is the other fork. Why? No bow when you finally set the front end bearing torque, or final pinch there and lock the center neck pinch, then torque all pinches to spec. Recheck the axle float. Hold the wheel in the center of the forks and the axle sends itself right in.
Feels fine leaned over one way, feels sketchy the other way... fork misalignment.

2. Did you see the slop when he shook the washer and guide plate for a better name? Step on the bottom rung of chain and tighten axle. Why? Because you can play this 2 ways:
a. I'm not about to draw a two dimensional blueprint drawing and cast it out a mm or more are you kidding me? Step on the chain and aim those puppies up with; mark on the plate to cast on the swing arm.
b. I'm going to take fingernail polish in yellow, and paint a flat on the adjust bolts. I run the bolts in all the way first, then mark each upright flat and now I count each 360 degree turns till I am so anal, I now stop at a flat, step on the chain, axle tight, then snug it up a half or chase a flat short of pulling the threads out of the swing... snug is good and the axle is not going anywhere with the lock nut holding the bolt in place.
c. I'm all about a sloppy chain so I don't miss a shift. The video's yank on that chain was too tight for me. A borderline miss-shifter, we do a little high speed work. Once the axle is tight, I'm going to spin for high spots. That's caused by not timing the link to the tooth it came off of very first day that OEM tire was changed. You now set a new pattern. I believe that is one cause of the high low spin at it. 18k and a few sets of tires later, I have zip for a hi-low spin.

I bet you have hands off and it still hunts. Now we are back to tire profile wear at the front wheel. It's called step. Look to the side of the tire and see the center looking like a paddle wheel. That's wobble country. So you change tires as a set. Want to mess around with tire pressure, front end says max 42; go 3-4 pounds more and cause this U to this V and you have a racing skate, rather then a figure it out or you'll be the rake over the rocks changing the fungswae.

 
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