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I am sure those that are in warmer areas dont have to worry about the cold..
But for those of us that put our bikes away for the winter
Tell us what you do to get your Streets ready?
And she and how do you store them?
 

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I store mine indoors, in a heated facility, fuel stabilizer added (Seafoam, Sta-Bil 360 or equivalent) with a cover.

Both my bikes have Battery Tenders however where I store them I can't access power so I just go and start them every 3-4 weeks, let them run until "hot" (maybe give them a quick run around the parking lot of it's not snow covered or wet). Good time to clean/detail the bike too when I'm there each time.

Bikes sit on the ground (not jacked up) but they do sit on rubber floor mats.

I've never had a problem starting them or having the battery run down over the Winter. (This will be the first Winter with my Street 750 though, so it should be interesting. The Owners Manual says to put the bike on a battery tender. I'm just going to go start it like I have with my C50T every few weeks)
 

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@1064,




Here in Denver, while we have periods in winter when we can't get out, there are breaks when we can so many don't completely "store them" for winter. Given the hassle that I see with access to the STREET battery I'm taking no chances and therefore I use the recommend tender identified in the H-D manual. That said, however, I have a friend who owns a HONDA 1800 VTX and practices what you describe without a tender and GET THIS, he is on his 11th year with the same original battery!!!! I realize that's hard to believe but it's true. And, yes, that Sta-Bil 360 works like magic, I once had a tank that sat >1 year that started right up, thanks to that additive.


GOOD LUCK MY FRIEND,


JMB
 

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When I lived in Minnesota I would run Sea Foam through the fuel system and change the oil, toss a cover over the bike and pout all the way to the house because I knew it would be months until I would be on the bike again.
 

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I'm in Midwest so we have days thought the winter that is nice enough to ride. So we just plug the bikes up to a tender. I've been sick for a few weeks so the street and king are sleeping in the garage. Hoping for a nice day soon to get out and ride.
 

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Oh I forgot about the battery. I would take the battery out of the bike and put in on a shelf (not on the floor) in the house next to the batteries for the boat, riding mower and both motor-home batteries. Then I'd swap my charger with winter mode on between them every couple weeks. All the years I lived in the upper Midwest, never had an issue with anything in the spring. I swear by Sea Foam and a battery tender.
 

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I would change the Oil with a Synthetic. SeaFoam in the gas. And the Tender
 

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I prepare for winter by wearing layers. Oh, and I bought some god awful tacky things to put around the handlebars to hopefully keep my hands warm.
 

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A question from a hot tropical climate where winter does not exist. Tell us more about Seafoam. What does it do in the gas and how do you get it out after winter?
 

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A question from a hot tropical climate where winter does not exist. Tell us more about Seafoam. What does it do in the gas and how do you get it out after winter?
Seafoam is a fuel additive that helps stabilize the fuel so it doesn't gunk up the system while it sits for months, it controls moisture so you don't end up with water in the fuel, and it cleans the system as it burns out. You don't remove it, you just burn it with the fuel.

Heck, you can add it to your crankcase also to clean oil deposits. I've always kept a can or 2 around.
 

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Seafoam is a fuel additive that helps stabilize the fuel so it doesn't gunk up the system while it sits for months, it controls moisture so you don't end up with water in the fuel, and it cleans the system as it burns out. You don't remove it, you just burn it with the fuel.

Heck, you can add it to your crankcase also to clean oil deposits. I've always kept a can or 2 around.

I've never tried Seafoam. Do you consider it better than Stay-Bil ; just asking?
 

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I personally like it more because I believe Sta-Bil is strictly a fuel stabilizer and not a moisture eliminator or cleaning agent. Maybe Sta-Bil has improved to encompass those as well by now, I don't know. I've never had an issue with Seafoam so I've never tried anything else.
 

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Thanks Static07, it shows you are never too old to learn. I have a friend on a farm that has a 40 year old Honda Goldwing, in pristine and original condition. It is not ridden a lot through the year but he uses L-100 AVGAS that he gets on a 5 gal drum from a local airport. The aviation fuel also has something in it to combat moisture in the tank. He told me that he runs hotter spark plugs to compensate for the 100 octane fuel.
 

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Careful with that one. About a year or so ago, One of the Gas stations pumped Aviation Fuel Unknowingly. Wrecked ALOT of cars. Luke Oil I believe. HD advises Against Methanol fuel additives. Seafoam is Propanol.
 

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Its not too cold here this morning.. 11F above zero. This will be the second year I have winterized my Street 750.
Since I live upstairs in my apartment complex, the management much less the neighbors would no appreciate me motoring up the stairs with my bike and I wouldn't risk it anyways. I find that putting a Premium fuel with NO ETHANOL additives with the brand name Stabil with a full tank works great (No moisture issues) with a fresh oil change. In addition a battery tender, I use a 200 thread count queen size fitted sheet to cover bike with. Oh, my garage is not heated and my bike was subjected to below zero air temps this past winter.
 
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