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Discussion Starter #1
The Boulevard S40 is an interesting bike. MSRP $5,699

Engine: 652cc, 4-stroke airhead single
Bore x Stroke: 94.0 mm x 94.0 mm (3.70 in x 3.70 in)
Fuel System: MIKUNI BS40, single

Not too many new bikes out there with factory carbs.

Suspension Front: Telescopic, coil spring, oil damped
Suspension Rear: Swing arm type, coil spring, oil damped
Brakes Front: Disc brake
Brakes Rear: Drum brake
Tires Front: 100/90-19 M/C 57H, tube type
Tires Rear: 140/80-15 M/C 67H, tube type

Overall Length: 2180 mm (85.8 in)
Overall Width: 720 mm (28.3 in)
Wheelbase: 1480 mm (58.3 in)
Ground Clearance: 135 mm (5.3 in)
Seat Height: 700 mm (27.6 in)
Curb Weight: 173 kg (381 lbs)

Its Belt Driven, what do y'all think?


 

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That street is nice, I just wouldn't get in that color, but if you like it, get it, i think it's good. Not going to wait for the new Street 750?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm considering all my options. TBH I had my eye on the boulevard first, intending to buy spring 2014 but then harley went and announced the Street 750...

Just a thread for open comparisons and opinions on both...

There are more colors...
 

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Even though this bike is cheaper I would still choose the Street 500 instead. I just really want a Harley. This Suzuki looks like a good base to start a build from though. The Suzuki has a higher displacement even though it costs less though, so there will be many who are drawn in by that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Even though this bike is cheaper I would still choose the Street 500 instead. I just really want a Harley. This Suzuki looks like a good base to start a build from though. The Suzuki has a higher displacement even though it costs less though, so there will be many who are drawn in by that.
the boulevard S40 competes with the Street 750 not the Street 500...
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
As if a chain has never broken....

Belts are lighter than chains, they reduce unsprung mass at the rear. When Buell was with Harley he used to war against unsprung mass. All harleys since 2003 use a belt system, except from the factory they come stock with a chain, swapping to belt on those is simple. The Street 500 and 750 both use Harleys belt final drive...

Belts are quiter, don't rust and dont need lube....
 

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As if a chain has never broken....

Belts are lighter than chains, they reduce unsprung mass at the rear. When Buell was with Harley he used to war against unsprung mass. All harleys since 2003 use a belt system, except from the factory they come stock with a chain, swapping to belt on those is simple. The Street 500 and 750 both use Harleys belt final drive...

Belts are quiter, don't rust and dont need lube....
As we can see, Belts for the win!
 

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As if a chain has never broken....

Belts are lighter than chains, they reduce unsprung mass at the rear. When Buell was with Harley he used to war against unsprung mass. All harleys since 2003 use a belt system, except from the factory they come stock with a chain, swapping to belt on those is simple. The Street 500 and 750 both use Harleys belt final drive...

Belts are quiter, don't rust and dont need lube....
The street uses belts to drive the wheels too? :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The street uses belts to drive the wheels too? :eek:
Harley is funny like that. They use a belt drive setup with a chain...



the primary is belt driven, final is chain but harley makes their chain drives interchangeable with belts from what I can tell. Perhaps a true harley aficionado can correct...
 

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Belts are fine. MY bike is eleven years old no belt problems. Enjoy the ride.
 

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Harley is funny like that. They use a belt drive setup with a chain...



the primary is belt driven, final is chain but harley makes their chain drives interchangeable with belts from what I can tell. Perhaps a true harley aficionado can correct...
The only factory Harley with a belt primary drive (the drive between the engine and transmission) was the FXB ('B' for belt) Sturgis from the early 1980's, which used the Shovelhead motor and the old 4-speed (rigid-mounted) frame. The FXB also had a rubber belt final drive - it pioneered both these technologies. The FXB's primary was enclosed (externally you cannot tell the difference between an FXB belt driven primary and the otherwise very similar FXS chain drive primary). All air-cooled V-twin Harley's before or since have used a chain driven primary. The problem with the enclosed rubber-mounted primary was that temperatures in the enclosed primary could get pretty high, which limited belt life. There are many aftermarket "open" primary drives which are belt driven (as in the picture posted above). Some of them have a cover, but all of them are designed to have significant airflow to the primary drive to keep the belt cool. Harley itself has stuck with the chain primary drive for Big Twins since the FXB. Sportsters have always had chain primary drive.

Since the mid 1980's all Harley Big Twins have had rubber belt final drives (instead of the chain). Sportsters got belt final drives a little later - I think it was the mid-1990's. Since the final drive is out in the air, it doesn't suffer from high temperatures (as the belt primary drive did) and has a reputation for durability. However - though the belts themselves are lighter than a chain, the pulleys which the belts require are significantly heavier than the equivalent chain sprocket. I believe in most cases chain final drive has lower unsprung weight - but the difference is not large. Racers and others where maintenance-free operation is less of a priority favor chain final drive because it is (marginally) lighter, narrower, and (most importantly) much easier to change ratios, since the master link can be taken off. In most applications replacing the belt (necessary to change ratios) requires at a minimum removing the swingarm. In a Big Twin with the standard left-side final drive, you also have to remove the clutch and primary as well.

The Street 500 and 750 have been listed as having belt primary drive, which jives with their market, which is aimed at being user-friendly (no messy, maintenance-intensive chains). However, I haven't read anything about the primary drive. But since it is based on the VRod motor, it would be a safe bet that it has the same primary drive system as the VRod - which is a gear-driven primary drive, as common in many modern designs. Notice also that the primary drive appears to be on the right-hand side (and the clutch as well), opposite the left-side final drive, and opposite from standard air-cooled Harley twin practice (but the same as the VRod).

As a side note, one interesting thing is that the Street 500 and 750 have also been listed as having "screw-type" valve adjusters, which would need adjustment every XXXX (7500?) miles. That is one thing Sportsters would have over the Street 500/750, since the Sporster has maintenance-free hydraulic valve adjusters.
 

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Savage/S40 is a great first bike /smaller bike

I currently ride a 2011 HD Heritage Classic, but my first motorcycle was a 2003 Suzuki Savage. The S40 is the same thing as a Savage; they haven't substantially changed it since the 80s.

I love the Savage/S40.

When I first wanted to buy a Harley, I wanted to put some miles on a smaller (and cheaper) starter bike. I found my Savage, used, for $2,500. I put 500 miles on it and loved every mile. When my wife expressed interest in learning to ride, I bought a barely used S40 for a little under 4,000, and I love it too.

The dealer had me test a ride a small 2 cylinder Honda, under the argument it would do better on the highway- nope. The S40 has a lot of torque, and it is all I need under 60 mph. It will go faster, but it should primarily be an "around town" bike. I am 6' tall and weigh 225, so I am a little big for the S40, but I still ride it for fun on short runs. The big single cylinder is simple. The only warning is that the occasional backblast is a normal when decelerating quickly in gear, but that is part of the charm.

I am thinking about getting my wife a Street 750 someday, but for now, I highly recomend the S40 as a starter bike.
 
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