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I am new to the motorcycle world and decided to cut my teeth on a Street 750. I took delivery (literally, since I did not know how to ride it) on 8/23/14. I completed the Riders Edge program this past weekend at my local Harley shop and I officially know how to ride in a parking lot. It helped taking the class on the 500. I take my written test next Monday. I have learned a lot already, but I realize that I have so much more to learn. It will be nice to learn some tips from experienced riders through this forum. I am excited about this new adventure, but I still can't believe my wife said to go for it.
 

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I am new to the motorcycle world and decided to cut my teeth on a Street 750. I took delivery (literally, since I did not know how to ride it) on 8/23/14. I completed the Riders Edge program this past weekend at my local Harley shop and I officially know how to ride in a parking lot. It helped taking the class on the 500. I take my written test next Monday. I have learned a lot already, but I realize that I have so much more to learn. It will be nice to learn some tips from experienced riders through this forum. I am excited about this new adventure, but I still can't believe my wife said to go for it.
Welcome aboard. Glad to read you took the Riders Edge course. Apply what you learned in the parking lot when you ride on the street is my first piece of advice.

Next piece of advice is take it easy. Experience is gained with seat time so start out trying to get a lot of seat time away from as much traffic as possible. I don't care if it amounts to nothing more than riding around on your local neighborhood streets for hours on end as long as you're getting seat time as that will provide you with experience. Much of what experienced riding is about is riding without actually thinking about it and always doing the right thing because of seat time. Obviously avoiding traffic early on is because other vehicles represent the greatest threat to a rider.

Getting out on the back roads will also help you. Be careful to not over-ride your comfort level in the turns. The motorcycle will actually turn better and tighter than your "comfort level" but don't push it. Work up to speed over time and don't be shy about using the brake before a curve or turn!

There is no such thing as going into a turn or curve too slowly but going in too fast is obviously dangerous.

Finally avoid "tunnel vision" which is what happens when you focus too much on what is right before you. Always look ahead down the road to where you're going. Riders Edge taught you to turn your head, not just your eyes, because the motorcycle will almost magically go where you point your head... and look at least five to ten seconds ahead of where you're at the moment. The farther down the road you look the better able you are to deal with what can possibly happen and react to it. It is a trick of motorcycle racers that always look way ahead of where they're at.


Seat time, seat time, seat time and taking it easy and safely while gaining that seat time is the primary advice that I think any experienced rider will give you.....

..... and of course enjoying every minute of it along the way!!
 

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Welcome aboard. Glad to read you took the Riders Edge course. Apply what you learned in the parking lot when you ride on the street is my first piece of advice.

Next piece of advice is take it easy. Experience is gained with seat time so start out trying to get a lot of seat time away from as much traffic as possible. I don't care if it amounts to nothing more than riding around on your local neighborhood streets for hours on end as long as you're getting seat time as that will provide you with experience. Much of what experienced riding is about is riding without actually thinking about it and always doing the right thing because of seat time. Obviously avoiding traffic early on is because other vehicles represent the greatest threat to a rider.

Getting out on the back roads will also help you. Be careful to not over-ride your comfort level in the turns. The motorcycle will actually turn better and tighter than your "comfort level" but don't push it. Work up to speed over time and don't be shy about using the brake before a curve or turn!

There is no such thing as going into a turn or curve too slowly but going in too fast is obviously dangerous.

Finally avoid "tunnel vision" which is what happens when you focus too much on what is right before you. Always look ahead down the road to where you're going. Riders Edge taught you to turn your head, not just your eyes, because the motorcycle will almost magically go where you point your head... and look at least five to ten seconds ahead of where you're at the moment. The farther down the road you look the better able you are to deal with what can possibly happen and react to it. It is a trick of motorcycle racers that always look way ahead of where they're at.


Seat time, seat time, seat time and taking it easy and safely while gaining that seat time is the primary advice that I think any experienced rider will give you.....

..... and of course enjoying every minute of it along the way!!
This is all very good advice.

Something else...

Without ABS, it's easy to lock up the back wheel and skid by over-applying the back brake (in an emergency situation). Practice stopping using the front & back brake together until you can brake quickly & safely. Braking a car is different.
 

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I am new to the motorcycle world and decided to cut my teeth on a Street 750. I took delivery (literally, since I did not know how to ride it) on 8/23/14. I completed the Riders Edge program this past weekend at my local Harley shop and I officially know how to ride in a parking lot. It helped taking the class on the 500. I take my written test next Monday. I have learned a lot already, but I realize that I have so much more to learn. It will be nice to learn some tips from experienced riders through this forum. I am excited about this new adventure, but I still can't believe my wife said to go for it.
My advise is to try to determine who knows something and who claims to know something. When you find the right people with the corect answers, focus on those and ignore the answers of the posers. As a newbie, it kan be chalenging making the determinations.
I have noticed that some persons will answer but do not know. They seem to like being thought of as knowlegeable. I have found that there are a lot more knowlegeable persons willing to help than the ignorant or incorrect variety. -Not to mention the addicted to argument and confrontation.
Congratulations on your Street purchase!
 
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