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Welcome to the asylum. You are going to love the bike. Pictures and what color did you get.
 

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Hello everyone,

My name is Liam, I'm new to riding, just brought home my first bike, the Street 750 yesterday.


Welcome and please take your time learning to ride safely. The Street 750 is a very powerful motorcycle to learn on so always be careful in your riding. Rider safety always has to be the number one concern.
 

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Nice pick. I have vivid black as well. I agree **** nice bike. Wish the son
Had not stolen it.
 

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As Stone mentioned, that is a very strong machine to cut your riding teeth with. It can get away from you in a heart beat. Be careful and don't clown around with it.
Welcome to the Street Forums.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Nice!

Do you have any plans in terms of accessories or mods?
I already removed the muffler, waiting to get the screaming eagle pipe, for now my neighbors can suffer the wrath of yet another straight piped vehicle in my driveway. ☺ I also plan on getting some highway foot pegs in the near future.
 

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for now my neighbors can suffer the wrath of yet another straight piped vehicle in my driveway.

I have more respect for my neighbors than that. We already have one loud-azz Harley in the neighborhood that everyone complains about. I actually like the stock sound of the Street. I can come and go at any hour of the day or night and no one knows. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have more respect for my neighbors than that. We already have one loud-azz Harley in the neighborhood that everyone complains about. I actually like the stock sound of the Street. I can come and go at any hour of the day or night and no one knows. :)
I will agree the stock muffler makes it quite stealthy, would have been helpful during those sneaking home late high school days haha. ;)
 

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I was considering the 1200 sportsters, but i liked the way the street felt and that it was a lot easier to learn to ride on.


I completely agree with your decision. As a Sportster owner I can say that's it not a good motorcycle for a beginning rider whereas the Streets are. I would actually recommend the Street 500 over the Street 750 for a new rider because the extra horsepower really is something a new rider isn't quite prepared for but that doesn't prohibitive for a new rider.


Then again I'm very conservative when it comes to motorcycles and when I learned it took me about 10 years before I broke the 750cc size as I moved up slowly from 70cc to 600cc prior to jumping onto a Z1 Kawasaki in the mid 1970's.
 

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I completely agree with your decision. As a Sportster owner I can say that's it not a good motorcycle for a beginning rider whereas the Streets are. I would actually recommend the Street 500 over the Street 750 for a new rider because the extra horsepower really is something a new rider isn't quite prepared for but that doesn't prohibitive for a new rider.


Then again I'm very conservative when it comes to motorcycles and when I learned it took me about 10 years before I broke the 750cc size as I moved up slowly from 70cc to 600cc prior to jumping onto a Z1 Kawasaki in the mid 1970's.
Wow that's a long time in the lower CC range. what was the highest CC bike you have owned?
 

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Wow that's a long time in the lower CC range. what was the highest CC bike you have owned?


While I've ridden motorcycles with larger displacements 1200cc, like my current Sportster, is the largest displacement I've ever own. Then again I'm really a "Sportster" rider as it's my favorite overall motorcycle for several reasons.


Remember that I grew up in the 1960's where a 750cc motorcycle was a large displacement motorcycle. AMA racing was limited to 650cc and most of the popular motorcycle brands such as Triumph and BSA didn't even offer anything larger than 650cc. The original Sportster introduced in 1957 was only 883cc and it was considered to be "very large" displacement. The Honda CB750 introduced in 1969 was considered to be a large displacement motorcycle. Think about this. The WW II Harley WBA that was the foundation for the "style" of post WW II bobbers was a 45 cid, 740cc, flathead engine with only about 27 bhp (less than the Street 500).


Since then we've had "displacement inflation" that, in some cases, has reached the absurd. Who really needs a 145cid S&S engine and what the heck for? It's sort of like putting a Rolls Royce Merlin aircraft engine or a full blown Chrysler Hemi in a street rod. It's more about "freak show" as opposed to being anything practical.


In reality a 500cc and 750cc motorcycle is all anyone really needs for practical riding purposes. They'll both go faster than the speed limit and both have excellent engine performance characteristics. The rest depends on the configuration of the motorcycle. It can be a touring motorcycle, a cafe-racer good for local riding, a dual-sport, a dirt bike or even a custom chopper show bike like I'm building without any need for a larger displacement engine from a pragmatic standpoint. The 500cc/750cc engine is just fine and provides all of the power necessary for any practical use. The practical use is based upon how the motorcycle is configured and is not really dependent upon the engine size.
 

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Ah that's true, the era one grows up in does play a major role. Growing up these days kids are probably really leaning towards some 500-600 sport bike, same when it comes to bikes like the street.
 
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