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At what interval should I be doing oil changes Bike is broken in a bit now with 500 miles and taking it in for its first oil change but are you guys doing every 3k or 1.5k?
 

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I do 1k then every 4k to 5k. I do use Amsoil. But any quality oil will work
 

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I use synthetic and I simply change it every spring. I don't worry about mileage very much.
 

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Oil change normally should be linked to the conditions of use. Like dry and dusty conditions or extensive mileage being done regularly will dictate an early change. It's difficult to put a figure but as a thumb rule when conditions as described above are met, then every six months is a good time to change oil. Secondly, all oils have a shelf life of one year. Irrespective what the manufacturers say, all oils have additives which act as detergents or enhance oiliness and such like actions. When an engine is running and the oil heats up, certain chemical reactions take place which invariably alter the original composition and effectiveness of the oil. Therefore, it's best that the frequency for normal usage should be one year.
 

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I also generally change oil and filter once a year. I have only put 2500 miles on my VRSCR so far this year, so I will likely stick with conventional oil and save over half the cost of oil compared to synthetic (5 quarts for this bike). However, if I had ridden 5000 miles over the summer, I would change to synthetic, but still change it once a year. When it comes to oil and change intervals, you are going find that opinions vary greatly (just like politics), the key word here being OPINION. If in doubt, stick with the HD recommendations for change intervals, and you won't have any issues.

Usually oil manufacturers will recommend change intervals for their specific oils. I will give an example: I had a KX125 two stroke dirt bike that required a 32:1 mix. However using Amsoil synthetic two stroke oil allows you to mix 50:1 without any ill effects. I sent an email to them to confirm it for the KX application, and they replied within a day or so to ensure me that mixing 50:1 was no problem.
 

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I use synthetic and I simply change it every spring. I don't worry about mileage very much.
Time does not affect quality of oil, only miles. Manual says change every 5,000 miles. If I rode mine only 1,000 miles per year, I would change it every 5 years. Oil does not deteriorate in an engine just sitting there.
 

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"Loose Nut" from Houston, Texas
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Oil itself does not deteriorate, but can get contaminated sitting in engine. Living in Houston, we have high humidity and pretty good temperature swings. This will cause condensation to build up in crank case. Is it minor, sure, but it's there. That's why manufacturers not only give mileage, but most set a time limit of change to once a year. My view, oil is cheap, change it either by miles or time.
 

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Oil itself does not deteriorate, but can get contaminated sitting in engine. Living in Houston, we have high humidity and pretty good temperature swings. This will cause condensation to build up in crank case. Is it minor, sure, but it's there. That's why manufacturers not only give mileage, but most set a time limit of change to once a year. My view, oil is cheap, change it either by miles or time.
LOL - deterioration and contamination mean the same thing. Even if there is a little, when you run it, it will burn off quickly w/o any harm.
Crankcases are pretty sealed. Unless your bike is outside during a hurricane, there won't be any condensation build up.
 

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LOL - deterioration and contamination mean the same thing. Even if there is a little, when you run it, it will burn off quickly w/o any harm.
Crankcases are pretty sealed. Unless your bike is outside during a hurricane, there won't be any condensation build up.
We will agree to disagree on this. Condensation does occur in the engine case. The crank case is not as sealed as most think. You have a breather tube from engine to intake, moisture will and does enter the crank case in humid and temp swings. You are correct that bringing engine up to full operating temp will burn the condensation off. But does everyone ride their bike long enough for this to happen.
 

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We will agree to disagree on this. Condensation does occur in the engine case. The crank case is not as sealed as most think. You have a breather tube from engine to intake, moisture will and does enter the crank case in humid and temp swings. You are correct that bringing engine up to full operating temp will burn the condensation off. But does everyone ride their bike long enough for this to happen.
Absolutely does not happen in a garage void of the morning dew and rain. And even outside, un less it has sat for months or years, the minuscule of moisture will burn right off when you run it. Plus. such moisture is totally pH neutral. It is ONLY acidity that degrades oil.
 

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Interesting discussion, two sides, both with valid points. I've rebuilt many internal engines which have sat for periods of time and have witnessed condensation damage on internal engine parts. You are 100% correct, an engine run on a regular basis will never encounter these issues. But for many motorcycles that's not always the case. A motorcycle for many will sit for months or longer without being started. If you poll most folks that hibernate their bikes for the winter, most do an oil change before riding their bikes in the spring. Your point appears to be condensation is not going to do any damage. My point is it can under the right situations. Oil is cheap, why not change it if bike has sat?

Quote from:
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"Motor oil must also protect against corrosion of engine components. Oxidation of the oil and contamination from condensation and combustion by-products cause acids to develop in the engine oil."
 

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That condensation in the oil can combine with sulfurous byproducts from the combustion cycle which collect in the oil to form sulfuric acid. The oil additive packages are normally a bit on the alkaline side to counter that. Once those are used up, acidity of the oil can increase rapidly. So it's not the condensation that does the most damage, but what it can become.
 

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FYI: When we bought a 1994 RV w/7.3L IDI (non-Powerstroke) diesel with 25K miles in Y2K, we found it must have had a piston with a bad oil ring, as it used one quart of oil in roughly 500 miles. Since the oil change interval was 5,000 miles, in that many miles of use, we would go thru 10 quarts of oil, which was exactly how much the crankcase held, which meant a full crankcase of fresh oil went thru in normal change oil interval, meaning therefore oil NEVER needed to be changed! This is exactly what we did in 12 years of use, only changing filter every 5,000 miles. This worked great! 😁😁😁

Obviously, the 30' RV was not garage kept, and we never had any engine problems. Since it had 60,000 miles on it when we sold it, oil changes (going thru 10 quarts of oil) therefore averaged about every 2 years.
 
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