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Haven't had a chance to get in a MSF course yet but I am afraid to gas too much (in order to not stall and get enough speed to lean) or gas too little (and stall or drop the bike because I'm trying to steer with the bars). Been watching YouTube tutorials, any veterans or newbies care to chime in with some safety tips?
 

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Haven't had a chance to get in a MSF course yet but I am afraid to gas too much (in order to not stall and get enough speed to lean) or gas too little (and stall or drop the bike because I'm trying to steer with the bars). Been watching YouTube tutorials, any veterans or newbies care to chime in with some safety tips?
I was raised on riding motorcyles rat racing around on our local gravel roads. we got pretty good at what we called power sliding around the corners. it was a blast!
well, many years later on my m109r, I got pretty good at power sliding that massively powerful bike on pavement too. it takes a good sense of how to handle the power of the bike you are riding, the road surface and how to quickly manipulate the throttle for the desired action.
 

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It's all about trusting yourself. Steady throttle, you will be fine. Go to a big empty parking lot and practice. Use the painted lines as markers. Set some goals. Comfortable wide turns at first, then decrease the radius a bit as you gain confidence. Better to do it in a parking lot, then in traffic where there is more pressure on your mind.
 

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I'm a newbie too (had my Street for all of 3 weeks now!) and this was hard for me to get used to too. I even laid her down on a right turn from a stop (luckily it was a slow lay, LOL!) What I learned is that it's all about the clutch. Don't focus so much on the throttle. If you're letting the clutch out slowly, it's okay if you give it a little too much gas. You'll have to get used to hearing it rev without panicking, but once you do, you'll wonder why it was so hard to do in the first place! The nice thing is, once you do it correctly once, the next times will be exponentially easier.
 

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It is a wet clutch in the XG, it can take some high rev abuse. Better to cook a little oil than stall it out IMO. You will master the friction zone with time.

Parking Lot practice is the best thing you can do for yourself.

If you have not got Motorman Jerry Ride like a Pro video start there. Good information and lots of things to practice on the video.

One thing that no one seems to practice is hitting that motor off switch during a drop. Just practice like you are going over and get used to the flick of the thumb across that run/don't run switch. It will stop a lot of after action damage to you and the bike.

If you are going to drop a bike it might as well be the XG as they tend not to need a lot of parts after a drop.

Right turns suck mostly because you will be looking at the bike's front tire instead of where you want to go. Always always look where you want to go not at what you are afraid of! Or the spot you are afraid you will end up....
 

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Hi mate,
Watch this asap...!
Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist vol 2
https://youtu.be/KVWLIfChUwg

It's an oldie but a goodie

If you can, look for his book too(which was pt1 technically)
hope this helps
Keith Code is great to watch even for experienced riders. Good call.
Great advice on practicing your starts and stops in a parking lot till you master the clutch friction zone and low speed braking. You will get it.
Keep at it we need more bikers on the road!!
 

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Twist of the wrist is gospel. Friction zone. It's like a clutch in a car. Find a hill on a fraught traveled road and learn how to get your bike to climb the hill without stalling. That is your friction zone. Once you have a hill down, flat terrain is nothing. MSF course is also a great thing to do. I'd love to go back for the experienced rider class. Low speed turning is all about clutch and throttle control.
 
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