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Discussion Starter #1
Just Curious!

About 20 months ago, I bought a brand new Ryker 600 2 cylinder, when I could have gotten a Ryker 900 3 cylinder for about $1500 more, even though money was not an issue at all. Reason: I do not ride fast, so a 47 HP Ryker was plenty of power.

Why did I but an XG500 when I was initially was looking for an XG750 or an XG750A when money was not an issue? Because a 2019 500 with only 638 miles was available, and 33.5 HP was good enough for my relatively low speed rides (even though I am quite heavy). Over a few short years, after having a Polaris Slingshot, I've had a Yamaha Majesty 400 scooter, then a Piaggio MP3 500 reverse trike leaning "scooter", then the Ryker. ALL of them had plenty of power for me, and the XG500 has same exact HP as the single cylinder Yamaha; 33.5 HP.

Cruising at 60 MPH is ideal for me.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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These Streets have been more popular overseas than in the United States. That is in part due to the progressive motorcycle license schemes in many countries. Unlike the United States, they restrict the displacement and/or power output of bikes that can be ridden by new riders. The Street 500 is OK for a beginning rider under the Learner Approved Motorcycle Scheme (LAMS) in Australia while the 750 exceeds the 660cc displacement cap.

I don't know how big a concern is for how many riders, but some jurisdictions calculate their road tax based on the displacement of the engine. An online calculator I found for Germany says a Street 500 is only taxed 36.80 €/year while a Street 750 is taxed at 55,00 €/year.

An MCN article from March discusses the UK charges Vehicle Excise Duty for motorbikes. It is currently calculated based on engine displacement. If you have a motorbike displacing less that 150cc, you pay £20 a year, while 151-400cc bikes cost £43 a year. The next threshold is 401-600cc, which is £66, and over that it’s £91. The article is about a scheme to complicate that by factoring carbon emissions into the formula along with displacement. The lower displacement bike would pollute less, thus be taxed less. There could also be differences in the emissions of the standard 750cc Revolution X engine and the high output version on the Street Rod.

Sometimes you just get a good deal on on Street 500's. One of my local dealerships gave up on doing rider academy and sold the Street 500's they had bought for a fraction of list price. Even after paying for tags, title, freight and dealer prep my out the door price would still have saved me of a couple of thousand dollars from list price on a Street 750. I almost bit at that, but decided I didn't need a second bike at the time.
 

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In South Africa they do not import Street 500 bikes at all. Only the Street/Street Rod 750 are available. When I first got a bike in the dark ages, you were only allowed to ride a 50cc between the ages of 16-18. Over 18 was unlimited and the biggest bike of the day was a Triumph Bonneville 650.

Years later, today an under 18 year old can ride a bike up to 125cc. My niece just got her first bike, a KTM Duke 125, to ride to school. Again in South Africa over 18 years, the sky is the limit. A just turned 18 year old with a pocket of money to burn can walk into the dealership and buy a Kawasaki H2 as his/her first bike. That decision by the authorities should fall under the "Strange but True" category.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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Most progressive motorcycle license schemes have the 125cc limit as the very first beginner bike and I skipped that. That's why you have the mini-motos like the Honda Grom, Monkey and Super Cub as well as the Kawasaki Z125 and lots of 125cc scooters. The Street 500 is OK for a riders SECOND bike under most of those schemes and not a very first beginner bike.

My understanding is that in 2020 the Street 500 was only sold in countries for which it was the only H-D option for LAMS restricted riders. I don't know about earlier years.

Here in 'Murica we don't do that nonsense, so a 16 year old with an instruction permit can throw their leg over that H2 as long as they are supervised by a responsible adult. That sometimes ends poorly.
 
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