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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Just purchased a Street 750 a couple of weeks ago and now have 250 miles on it! I've love it so far but this Sunday I took it on a "long ride"(84 miles) at highway speeds (70~55 MPH) and filled up about a 12 miles away from home. On Monday I hopped on my bike to go about 2 miles at 25 mph and the entire time the bike jerked and sputtered (like it wanted to stall) the exhaust also was making a sputtering noise. I didn't think anything of it and just figured it needed to be warmed up. Today I went to start my bike and it would not start unless I held in the starter for a good 15-30 seconds. Once I got it started the sputtering situation only got worse. I only got around the block before I decided I didn't want to drop the bike (it kept stalling on take-off). I know these bikes have issues when the fuel is low but I have been very particular and kept the gas tank full.

Can anyone help?
 

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Hi all,

Just purchased a Street 750 a couple of weeks ago and now have 250 miles on it! I've love it so far but this Sunday I took it on a "long ride"(84 miles) at highway speeds (70~55 MPH) and filled up about a 12 miles away from home. On Monday I hopped on my bike to go about 2 miles at 25 mph and the entire time the bike jerked and sputtered (like it wanted to stall) the exhaust also was making a sputtering noise. I didn't think anything of it and just figured it needed to be warmed up. Today I went to start my bike and it would not start unless I held in the starter for a good 15-30 seconds. Once I got it started the sputtering situation only got worse. I only got around the block before I decided I didn't want to drop the bike (it kept stalling on take-off). I know these bikes have issues when the fuel is low but I have been very particular and kept the gas tank full.

Can anyone help?
Take it to your dealer it is under warranty!!!
 

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sounds to me like you got bad gas.
you can syphon it all out and put fresh gas in it from a different source then try it again, if it continues, then i'd certainly take it to the dealer.
 

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Same thing happened to me. After that and getting the dealer to pick the bike up for the 3rd time, I finally got a fuel pump replacement. The new service manager knew about tech tip 442 and said that even though the tank was full, the gas was sloshing around in the tank and the fuel pickup was not functioning properly. The previous time they adjusted my throttle and temporarily fixed the problem. The first time I was told to keep the fuel pump wet and keep at least a gallon of gas in it. Hopefully the fuel pump replacement will do the trick, but that is yet to be seen.
 

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Same thing happened to me. After that and getting the dealer to pick the bike up for the 3rd time, I finally got a fuel pump replacement. The new service manager knew about tech tip 442 and said that even though the tank was full, the gas was sloshing around in the tank and the fuel pickup was not functioning properly. The previous time they adjusted my throttle and temporarily fixed the problem. The first time I was told to keep the fuel pump wet and keep at least a gallon of gas in it. Hopefully the fuel pump replacement will do the trick, but that is yet to be seen.
i'd like to see an aftermarket company solve our fuel pump problem, Harley doesn't seem to be able to do it. even an external fuel pump that can be mounted in the tube under the front of the seat, using a DIY kit that we can install ourself, and that has the pickup tube in the tank where sloshing wouldn't be an issue.
 

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Absolutely. So long as the pump is set up for similar output (usually in the 1-5 bar range) Your fuel regulator and injectors will handle the rest. A lot of the fittings are pretty universal. Heck you could even do away with an internal pump and use an external pump like a lot of older EFI bikes, it's just unsightly. All depends on your fab skills and so on. But you can kiss that warranty goodbye.
 

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Absolutely. So long as the pump is set up for similar output (usually in the 1-5 bar range) Your fuel regulator and injectors will handle the rest. A lot of the fittings are pretty universal. Heck you could even do away with an internal pump and use an external pump like a lot of older EFI bikes, it's just unsightly. All depends on your fab skills and so on. But you can kiss that warranty goodbye.
Makes me wonder why it's such a problem for harley to come up with a solution
 

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You want to factor in the placement of the pump and pickup itself as well. Our tank is pretty large and rather level which allows for a lot of potential sloshing of fuel. This can easily pull fuel from the pick up tube and voila, lag and leap. Factor in that this one is a plastic press fit, I think the tank sloshing and road vibration is actually helping to jar it loose on replacement pumps. If you look at the riding academy bikes, they're not seeing any issues, but they keep them fueled up constantly so there is far less stress on the pick up while submerged in fuel... just my thoughts on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Took the bike back to the dealer. My luck, this is the first time they have had to work on the Street and said it could be a few weeks before I get it back. Worse yet, no chance of rain for the next few days.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The shop is closed today so I do not have an update. I am however, wondering if I should call the dealership tomorrow and tell them rather than me bringing the bike in several times for the same issue and enacting the Lemon Law, we should cut our losses and trade for the Iron 883. I doubt this will work but given the pure volume of discussion on these types of issues I am sure my bike will see "30 days of service within the first year of ownership". Thoughts?
 

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The shop is closed today so I do not have an update. I am however, wondering if I should call the dealership tomorrow and tell them rather than me bringing the bike in several times for the same issue and enacting the Lemon Law, we should cut our losses and trade for the Iron 883. I doubt this will work but given the pure volume of discussion on these types of issues I am sure my bike will see "30 days of service within the first year of ownership". Thoughts?
I think you should! If it gets to that point I would definitely tell them "it's either you give me my money back and I go with Honda, OR, a new Iron 883" and it would probably cost them less to give you the Iron 883 back plus the money they would lose out on if you bought a Honda (Harley merch, future bikes, repair $ervices, etc)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just got a call from the dealer today. They said a "woodruff key" came loose and essentially destroyed the rotor. They were surprised because this is an issue that hey have never seen on newer bikes. They are ordering a new rotor and hope this will solve the problems. I guess this is not related to the fuel pump issue, has anyone experienced this?
 
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