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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings,

I have been giving some serious thought to picking up a 750 in the near future and the SE Nightstick looks to be a worthwhile addition. I'm wondering if it's advisable to go the whole Stage 1 route if a deal can be worked at the time of purchase or if it's money best left in the pocket?
 

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Greetings,

I have been giving some serious thought to picking up a 750 in the near future and the SE Nightstick looks to be a worthwhile addition. I'm wondering if it's advisable to go the whole Stage 1 route if a deal can be worked at the time of purchase or if it's money best left in the pocket?
Normally it's always a good idea when one is upgrading the exhaust system to also address the intake. After all the input and output must be matched if performance is he criterion. Thus a stage I would be a good idea. Having said that, there are a number of people who change exhausts for only sound or aesthetics. You decide what is it that you want and of course how deep are your pockets.
 

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Normally it's always a good idea when one is upgrading the exhaust system to also address the intake. After all the input and output must be matched if performance is he criterion. Thus a stage I would be a good idea. Having said that, there are a number of people who change exhausts for only sound or aesthetics. You decide what is it that you want and of course how deep are your pockets.


From experience in racing any changes to the intake/exhaust really need a change in the cam. Without changing the lift and duration of the valves most intake/exhaust modifications don't do much because the valves opening and closing the primary restriction. Just my take on it of course.
 

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From experience in racing any changes to the intake/exhaust really need a change in the cam. Without changing the lift and duration of the valves most intake/exhaust modifications don't do much because the valves opening and closing the primary restriction. Just my take on it of course.
You are absolutely right there. To get any meaningful results in performance, you have to go the whole hog.
Honestly, the Street750 is versatile enough as a stock model for most people. If someone wants a faster bike, get a Ducati or Hayabusa or something like that.
 

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If you put enough money into the Street it may just be more worth it to buy a more expensive bike in the first place, unless you really like the Street anyway. I also don't really know enough about bikes to make educated decisions about mods. I can do basic stuff but choosing a whole bunch of stuff is a bit overwhelming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cost is one of my primary decision factors, neck and neck with longevity. Since this will be my first bike I'm not looking to dump a lot of money in up front, nor do I want to be in a position where I'm wanting "more bike" before the payments are up.

The 750 seems to strike that balance fairly well. My initial question was centered more on potential options available at the initial purchase as a package deal. If I can save some bucks up front on upgrades I'm likely to do eventually anyway then that would seem to be the smarter move.

I seem to remember (incorrectly perhaps) StoneFree mentioning in another thread that the stock intake had more flow than was really necessary. If that is the case, and if the addition of the SE exhaust doesn't up the requirement substantially, then it would seem that the intake upgrade would not be necessary.

Or maybe I'm just over-thinking the whole thing. Either way, the local dealer has an open house tomorrow and I'm hoping to get some seat time. Going to be a couple months before I can sign papers anyway.
 

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Cost is one of my primary decision factors, neck and neck with longevity. Since this will be my first bike I'm not looking to dump a lot of money in up front, nor do I want to be in a position where I'm wanting "more bike" before the payments are up.

The 750 seems to strike that balance fairly well. My initial question was centered more on potential options available at the initial purchase as a package deal. If I can save some bucks up front on upgrades I'm likely to do eventually anyway then that would seem to be the smarter move.


You're correct (IMHO) on picking the Street 750 because, had it been around, it would have been an ample motorcycle for me over my entire riding lifetime (although I would have turned it into a bobber or chopper like I'm doing now). As I mentioned when I first rode the 500 and 750 they reminded me of a Suziki 650 I had back in the 1960's and I would have had no problem riding that Suzuki forever.


When it comes to performance there's an old saying that the only replacement for cubic inchers is cubic dollars. The Street 500 and Street 750 both have all of the horsepower economically available and significant additional horsepower is going to really cost a cubic butt-load of dollars.


I'm with the camp that says both the Street 500 and Street 750 have more than enough horsepower for 99% of all riders so I'd avoid spending dollars to try and improve something you probably don't need to begin with (i.e. more horsepower). If you want better sound then change the exhaust or muffler. If you want different looks then address that. But I'd stay out of the spending a lot of money on trying to significantly increase engine performance because you don't really need more power.


It's your call in the end of course........
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
When it comes to performance there's an old saying that the only replacement for cubic inchers is cubic dollars. The Street 500 and Street 750 both have all of the horsepower economically available and significant additional horsepower is going to really cost a cubic butt-load of dollars.


I'm with the camp that says both the Street 500 and Street 750 have more than enough horsepower for 99% of all riders so I'd avoid spending dollars to try and improve something you probably don't need to begin with (i.e. more horsepower). If you want better sound then change the exhaust or muffler. If you want different looks then address that. But I'd stay out of the spending a lot of money on trying to significantly increase engine performance because you don't really need more power.


It's your call in the end of course........
Excellent points. I did get the opportunity to take a 750 for a spin today. First time back on a bike since I did MSF a couple months ago. Once I got over the initial nerves and got in the flow I wound up with the biggest, stupidest grin that took the better part of a couple hours to go away.

The 750 definitely felt like plenty of bike. Talking with the dealer, he said that in his opinion the 750 is quicker than his 48. Don't know how true that claim is, but it did get up and move with a handful of throttle.
 

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Excellent points. I did get the opportunity to take a 750 for a spin today. First time back on a bike since I did MSF a couple months ago. Once I got over the initial nerves and got in the flow I wound up with the biggest, stupidest grin that took the better part of a couple hours to go away.

The 750 definitely felt like plenty of bike. Talking with the dealer, he said that in his opinion the 750 is quicker than his 48. Don't know how true that claim is, but it did get up and move with a handful of throttle.


I own both a Street 750 and a 1200cc Sportster ('07 XL50) and I can't tell the difference engine performance-wise (handling is completely different). I've been told that the Street 750 is actually faster in the 1/4 mile than the Sportster from the service manager at my local Harley dealer and don't doubt it.
 

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While I've mentioned that I don't believe that seeking additional performance unless you're willing to spend a ton of dough is worthwhile I've also mentioned that changes for other reasons can warrant a change. I've also mentioned on other threads that we're working on prototyping drag pipes for the Street 500 and Street 750 for both appearance and sound. Today we just started to work on that and purchased the steel tubing to start.


Having been a manager for after market motorcycle exhaust manufacturing gives me a lot of insight into what we need to do so that's cool. It shouldn't be too hard to actually develop the prototype but it does take my partner and I forever to get it done. Hopefully in about a month I'll be able to share pictures.
 

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While I've mentioned that I don't believe that seeking additional performance unless you're willing to spend a ton of dough is worthwhile I've also mentioned that changes for other reasons can warrant a change. I've also mentioned on other threads that we're working on prototyping drag pipes for the Street 500 and Street 750 for both appearance and sound. Today we just started to work on that and purchased the steel tubing to start.


Having been a manager for after market motorcycle exhaust manufacturing gives me a lot of insight into what we need to do so that's cool. It shouldn't be too hard to actually develop the prototype but it does take my partner and I forever to get it done. Hopefully in about a month I'll be able to share pictures.
Stone free, New pipes for the Street for better sound and looks are welcome. Looking forward to seeing your product when it's ready.
 

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Stone free, New pipes for the Street for better sound and looks are welcome. Looking forward to seeing your product when it's ready.


There is just so much to do for us. We want to get the drag pipes developed but also have forward foot controls, ape-hanger handlebars, a new horn mounting bracket (to move it behind the radiator and out of sight), and a whole new "faux rigid" rear swingarm using a mono-shock to eliminate the external shocks/springs... and then we need to work on creating rigid bobber and chopper frames after that. LOL


The amount of work before us is sometimes overwhelming but it is what we love to do and we'll knock of one thing at a time until everything is finally accomplished. It just take prioritizing the work.
 

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I know it's hard work and I can visualise what all you are up to. All the best and I for one am willing to wait for the results to show.


Not to mention we're in prime time riding season which puts a halt to virtually everything else. LOL
 
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