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I understand it's built by Harley, but to me a looks a lot more like a low-slung standard bike... well, the ones from the '70s and '80s anyway. Where's the line to be drawn between the two? What makes this a "post-modern cruiser" (reviewer designation, not mine) instead of a retro standard?
 

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Lack of real bike knowledge by reviewers. Anyone who knows old bikes will compare them to the Japanese standard bikes of yesteryear. If Harley were really smart they'd market them in that light and draw more people to them.
 

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"Lack of real bike knowledge by reviewers." Well stated Charles.

Looking through the new line-up of Harley bikes there are two stand out machines. The V-Rod and the Street From the 883 through to the trikes the rest can be easily identified as Harley by design. Some are sportier and most are built for long cruises,

The V-Rod stands out as pure muscle and looks the part. Then there is the Street. It is tiny in stature, big in heart and fun to ride with a surprising economy figures. I still have motorists asking "What is that?"

Now for me that is the definition of a stand-out Harley-Davidson.
 

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When I decided, recently, to purchase a new bike to replace my old one that was stolen, I decided to go with something with a more "motorcycle" look then my Suzuki Burgman. The last actual motorcycle that I owned was a Honda 350.
. Then after spending the entire summer in the garage, too busy working to ride, I sold it. Fast-forward 35 years and I decided to get another two wheeler. I opted for the Suzuki scooter because it was easy to mount, and a breeze to ride. The main drawback was that it looked downright weird. Had that for about seven years and had dreams of getting a touring bike. Lack of money and old age nipped that idea in the bud. When I had to replace the Suzuki I decided I wanted something that resembled a motorcycle. Not too big, not too small, something in the 750 cc category. Virtually every bike that I looked at resembled a crotch rocket or something out of a science fiction movie. I wanted something like Honda used to make about 30 years ago. I was pleasantly surprised when I happened on the street 750. I didn't look at what it was called, standard or cruiser, I just like the looks of it. Add to that the price and lightweight and you can call it whatever the **** you like. I just prefer "motorcycle".
 

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I thought cruiser was based more on the upright rider position?
 

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If you look at most "Cruisers" they copy the late 70's & early 80's H-D Sportster look for example forward foot controls, higher handlebars and lower seating position.
 

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Reviews half the time don't know much about what they write. They read someone else BS and then add their spin. The Street is a total different Harley line. It shares nothing with the Sporty, Nor any other Harley. You could argue it has a hint of Vrod. That does not make it a bad thing. Harley need to at least offer something in the 500-750 class. Harley would not get away with offering metric style crotch rocket. The Street is what they came up with.
Looking for the HD sound on a Street is silly. Will never happen the engine is a totally different world. Street does not feel like a Harley or run like one in any way.
Again not a bad thing. If HD can sell enough of them the motorcycle riders will have a ball with them, lot of direction you can go with it.
Motley fool has for years planted anit Harley reviews, trying to prop up Victory that they are heavily invested in. Opps were. Now they are in deep with the fake Indian .
Harley's reentry into a mid- size motorcycle will be a rough road, there will be failures along the way. The Revtech engine has room to grow. The Street plat form does also. Harley must have a ride of their own for the Edge riders courses , they will figure it out.
Most of today riders are lazy. they just want to open the box and play with the toy. Generations in the past ripped open the box and ask ok what can we do with this thing. I am look forward to playing with this Street. It will never replace my RGU or FB softail like the Sporty that was first offered in 1957 the Street will have to inspire it's own following carve out it's own market.
 

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Some of the Parts on the Street are from the Sportsters. Battery, Ignition Coil. I know for a fact. As I have upgraded those. I read some of the Wheel Bearings are the same. Don't now for sure.
 

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2016 Harley-Davidson Street 750 in Sunglo Velocity Red
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I think reviewers make the assumption that if it's by H-D it must be a cruiser. I've seen a few YouTube reviewers that describe the Street series as either a standard, or what I liked best, H-D's modern take on the UJM.


When people ask about my bike I start out by calling it a "Hardly-Davidson". That's because everything about a typical H-D is different on this one, other than having a V-twin engine.
 

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That's always been my take -- the Street is Harley's version of the UJM. "Cruiser" has typically meant a v-twin, and a splayed-out riding position with your feet way forward. The Street isn't that. It's more of a "standard", which is exactly what I like about it.
 

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When I decided, recently, to purchase a new bike to replace my old one that was stolen, I decided to go with something with a more "motorcycle" look then my Suzuki Burgman. The last actual motorcycle that I owned was a Honda 350.
. Then after spending the entire summer in the garage, too busy working to ride, I sold it. Fast-forward 35 years and I decided to get another two wheeler. I opted for the Suzuki scooter because it was easy to mount, and a breeze to ride. The main drawback was that it looked downright weird. Had that for about seven years and had dreams of getting a touring bike. Lack of money and old age nipped that idea in the bud. When I had to replace the Suzuki I decided I wanted something that resembled a motorcycle. Not too big, not too small, something in the 750 cc category. Virtually every bike that I looked at resembled a crotch rocket or something out of a science fiction movie. I wanted something like Honda used to make about 30 years ago. I was pleasantly surprised when I happened on the street 750. I didn't look at what it was called, standard or cruiser, I just like the looks of it. Add to that the price and lightweight and you can call it whatever the **** you like. I just prefer "motorcycle".
My story is similar. After more than 30 years away from riding, I wanted something like my first bike, a 1978 Kawasaki KZ200. The look was pretty much the same for all bikes in the 70's. The Street is the closest thing to my trusty Kawasaki - just right for me, just a bigger engine and a Harley badge.
https://bikez.com/pictures/kawasaki/1978/z 200.jpg

http://www.cyclechaos.com/images/th...pg/640px-1978-Kawasaki-KX200A-Blue-9789-1.jpg


The Street is nowhere near a cruiser... the reviewers don't know what they're talking about and probably never rode one of the older/classic bikes.
 

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Same story here... I took 20+ years off from riding and wanted something easy to ride and familiar to me like the Suzuki Tempter 650 I rode before. The street perfectly filled that niche.

Now I want to add a larger displacement bike to the garage. I was really hoping to grab something from the sportster range but every one of them has a deal killer for me.

The custom is just blah (zero character), the forty eight has a weird riding position and a 60 mile gas tank, the roadster is too tall for me (really like the bike though). The iron 883 is perfect but is an 883 and not worth dropping 2 grand into for a big bore kit.

The only Dyna I like is the low rider S which is too pricey.

Now I'm checking out the Victory Octane. I couldn't care less if victory is done. Polaris is still making parts for a decade which will be available for many years after that. It's fast, good looking and comfortable all at a great price. Might just pull the trigger in one in a week or two.
 
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